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WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A SPY

* By ROBERT CLAYTON *

There's more to espionage than Mata Hari!

OF ALL professions, becoming a spy is one of the hardest of all tasks to accomplish. It takes more than the desire to serve as such, for it also takes the courage and the willingness to face all kinds of danger, and it takes the more than average intelligence a spy must have in order to keep himself from being apprehended.

Actually, there are four different and distinct classes of spies, and this article will deal with describing all of them. They are classified as such in time of war, and these are the classes roughly described into which they fall: the officers of the regular army, the patriotic volunteers, the mercenaries, and always, the informers.

It can be well appreciated and understood that during a war, the most effective form of all these classes, is the officer class, which is trained and equipped for the job and the men so occupied are carrying out their duties as part of their war service, only this happens to be in excess of duty. They are well equipped to handle all the different types of work that may fall into their hands. Actually, these officers, for the most part, are in command only of e group of spies, and very rarely is it found that they do the work themselves. They have subordinates who they order to do the work, and who are told exactly what it is they are to look for and where to look for it. But when there is some matter of great importance, these specially trained men do their work, too. just before the last war, when no one in this country dreamed oi such things happening to them, naval officers in the Japanese Navy, dressed in greasy overalls and heavy sou'westers, saile...

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